Tag: email guidelines

White Paper: Email Throttling and Strategies to Combat it

email-throttling

Whenever it comes to Email Marketing, marketers face a whole bunch of difficulties in terms of deliverability, list hygiene problems, monitoring glitches and many more. A seamless email marketing strategy is difficult to achieve unless these problems are properly addressed. ‘Email Deferral’-a critical case of Email deliverability, arises when some ISPs limit the amount of Emails sent out by a particular sender during a specified period of time. This happens due to a pre-defined threshold in the number of sendouts inflicted by the ISPs.

In most of the time, this is a 400 class error. Due to bouncebacks of the excessive number of emails, the email campaigns face significant drawbacks in terms of deliverability and performance. This can also lead to diminution of email reputation of the senders and can possess a bigger threat furthermore.

This white paper interprets the technical aspects of this issue and how email marketers can avoid the problem of Email Throttling. Although, Email Throttling seems to be too intriguing for Email Marketers to avoid, appropriate strategies can help marketers get rid of this problem.

Read more about it by downloading the White Paper from the link: www.kenscio.com/resources

The White Paper is authored by Mr. Ziaul Hussain, Client Success Manager, Kenscio.

 

 

Share

How optimizing your acquisition through E-Mail with CLV can multiply your revenue?

I will not be getting into the Do’s and Don’ts of acquiring customer through E-Mail and gaining momentum with CLV through various touch points and blah blah blah..

It is so stodgy that it hits my central nervous system badly, reminding me of a forced training and a manual guide of making things work in a way it is written!

Let’s dive into our circadian life, with some very interesting affairs! Everyday (More likely) we go to our nearest departmental store for our daily needs. It could be rice, soap or salt, regardless of the fact that how much square feet of a surface that store has occupied till the time it fulfills my need- Does this statement tie some business knots? Yes! It does. This affirms that we as an end user can go to any of the vendor/advertiser if he supplies/fulfills my requirement. Questionably I may not buy but I will go.

What Next?

Two examples to be cited:

A.)    I visit my nearest store for the very first time and enquire about the product that I need, may be a soap. While glaring at the stacks for my soap, the shop owner scans my eyes concurrently and finds me unacquainted and puzzled. Post that he asks some questions to explore my need. He then suggests the soap, which I like, or which fits my LSM score (Point to be noted, he just made a guess, might be a wild one). Conversation does not end here. He continues with some more questions like where do I live? He has not seen me before. What do I do? Who all are in my family and all! At times the gentleman who is also the custodian of the cash-counter may end the sales with a chocolate, as a freebie with a smile– Is there any core business fundamental you are able to see? You are right- He identified me as prospect, other than the transactions; he explored the future business by asking all relevant questions to me. Taking out time in knowing me, he tried to ensure my future visit. The freebie was an absolute relationship strengthening exercise.

B.)    Have you ever scrutinized your own action during the evaluation of a nearby departmental store on how economic he is! The first thing you do is you tend to ask the rates for products like Sugar, Rice, Flour etc., because, you border on the rates for the mentioned stuffs and then you see the quality.

During my first visit to the nearby grocery store to purchase my monthly household goods, I throw him a list of edibles starting from Rice to Roasted peas and sauce to salt. You know what! He will quote or charge me a very competitive price which I may not get even from the big retail chains for my much needed consumables which are rice, sugar, pulse etc. For rest of the rations, you will be charged a rupee up or down!  – Any business Logic? You guessed it right- just by reducing or being aggressive on my “must” consumable items; he suddenly gained my trust and faith. I have an inclination now. I started believing that he is genuine, competitive and affable. It means, he has calculated the revenue generated with the current purchase and approximated or predicted the future cash flows from me. In marketing, this is what you called “customer’s lifetime value

Regardless to say, on the various touch-points he bundles the product for me, offers something of great value, gives me credit and stuff like that- again, a marketing tactic or a strategy which has been created for me, which is relevant to me and that has been delivered to me in a way I liked it to be.

Relatively, that is the fundamental of every business, it is happening in our everyday life, which goes un-noticed from the core of marketing perspective.

This is being effectuated by a local small grocery store, which would not be catering to more than 250 households (roughly) in metros. Don’t you think it is doable, attainable and can be executed by big entities like yours too?

Why through e-mail is simply because, out of the total Internet population which is 243million as of June’ 2014 (IAMAI & IMRB, 2014), 80% use Internet to access emails.

That’s not all! The benefits of acquiring customer through emails are many. To list down a few: –

  • E-Mail is the most cost effective marketing tool.
  • During a survey done by Forrester Research, Marketers said that they enjoy the ROI by two to three times greater with email marketing than any other direct marketing channel.
  • An immediate attention with multiple links and CTAs are viable
  • The superlative degree of segmentation is possible.
  • Highly measurable which ultimately drives and boost your sales by up sells and cross sells.

 

So what have to be the action points?

  • Find out the right partner who does not require spoon-feeding, who are best in class, who embraces innovation, spends in developing employee’s skill-sets, and treats you as a partner.
  • Create/Source/Rent out the valuable and qualitative e-mail list of prospects. Deliver them the right content.
  • Feed curiosity. Remember you are now dealing with “Generation Z”
  • Get ready with your creative for every dimension.
  • Do multivariate or AB testing (Whatever suits). It’s imperative. Early monitoring is like tasting the food like a chef.
  • Be innovative & reasonable in bringing your customers on board.
  • Create various touch-points.
  • Do research and segmentation. Reduce the manpower dependency. Espouse technology. Remember- your consumer is everywhere and doing the best use of the technology.
  • Convey or communicate what your consumers want to listen to and accelerate their interest.
  • Be relevant and rewarding.
  • Drive engagement.
  • Try to recover the lost opportunities, which might be accountable for as big as 40%
  • Seek their advocacy or evangelize your communications and offerings.

Remember the theory, which has been cited in the aforementioned example, is a proven one. So, do not romance with it, execute it.

Call your mind for that grocery store owner, who, how effectively identified the prospect, probed, suggested, sold, been aggressive on pricing, secured the future business, created multiple touch-points, gave value adds and had thereby owned a customer for a life-time which essentially would be doing his advocacy.

The striking part for you is- Maximize & Multiply your revenue :)

What else? Isn’t it a good food for thought and a lesson to think through?

“Execute nicely or be executed nastily”

(Contributed by: Mr. Kumar Awanish, AVP- Strategy & Innovation, Kenscio Digital)

Share

Guide to a Better HTML Email Design – Part 17

16. Navigation and Search in Email Message

 

Your email is basically an extension of your Website so, where appropriate, make the navigation of your email message consistent with your Website — but also highlight key areas of your Website that are likely to get customers to take action. If you have Bargain Basement, Closeouts, Featured Products and other areas on your site — use them in your email.

If your Email Service Provider provides the feature of visually providing the user attention through the links clicks, You can analyze which sections of your email message are generating more clicks and optimize the offer placements to areas where the users are more likely to click.

You can also use multi-variate testing to test the email content and subject lines that provide the highest open and click through rates, before sending the email message to the entire audience.

If you have a search capability on your Website, add it to your email. Your customers can type in their search phrase, hit submit, and it will take them to your Website’s search-results page. You now have those people on your Website, where you have the potential to convert them to customers.

Allow your landing pages to be searchable by the search engines and look for user search phrases. This can provide what users are looking for on the web and this will provide very useful information on the subject lines for your email message.

Read earlier blogs on the subject “Guide to a Better HTML Email Design” on Kenscio Blog.

Share

Guide to a Better HTML Email Design – Part 11

10.Use Image Alt Tags

 

HTML “alt” tags display a text description of an image either when the image does not display or when a cursor rolls over a displayed image. Using alt tags in your HTML emails is important for three reasons:

Recipients using dial-up or other slow connections might not see images for several seconds. Displaying alt tag text can convey what is to come.

Many email clients (Outlook and Outlook Express) and email services (AOL, Yahoo and Gmail) disable images by default or display a warning message or command to download the images.

Gmail uses what it calls “snippets,” which display the first few text words it sees in an email, following the subject line. Gmail will also display the text from alt tags, so it is important to use this to your advantage – as an addendum to your subject line, for example.

A sample alt tag looks like this:
<img name=”index_r2_c2″ src=”http://mailer.aghreni.net/imgproxy/img/809298233/index_r2_c2.jpg” width=”163″ height=”85″ border=”0″ alt=”Aghreni logo” border=0>

 

Tips on using alt tags
Newsletters:
For logos, headers, section titles and other uses of images, describe the logo and image, but consider adding a brief teaser that explains that section of the email. If your email is a newsletter, an example of an alt tag that serves as both a teaser and a text version of the image might be: “Optimization — Strategies for improving email marketing performance”.

E-commerce Email:
Include short but complete descriptions of product photos or offers such as “50% off”.

Charts and Graphs:
Include enough text to explain the value and contents of the chart or graph, such as “Chart: Open Rates from A/B Split Test”.

Gmail Snippets/Preview Text:
Use an appropriate image in your header to display key teaser info. For ec-ommerce emails, the information might expand on special offers mentioned in the subject line, reinforce Free Shipping or promote additional products. For newsletters, consider mentioning additional articles beyond what is in the subject line, or expand on the existing topic.

While this sounds like a lot of work, at most it probably adds 5 to 10 minutes to your email production. Most importantly though, marketers who don’t use alt tags appropriately risk lower open and click-through rates because recipients might decide not to display images or act further.

Read earlier blogs on “Guide to a Better HTML Email Design” on Kenscio Blog.

Share

Guide to a Better HTML Email Design – Part 10

9. Images in Emails

 

You can use as many images in an email message as you wish – the right number depends on the purpose, type and focus of the email. For instance, e-commerce emails often have more images than promotional emails.

Consider using graphic images and buttons to draw a reader’s attention. These images can convey concepts in combination with your copy. Make sure your call-to-action is not only supported by an image but also by text. This way, if the images are turned off, the call-to-action is still clear.

Images for emails should be hosted on a Website and not embedded within the email to ensure proper rendering and to minimize the email’s file size.

Important note:

Define the size and parameters (horizontal and vertical height in pixels) of each graphic in the <IMG SRC> tags.

For example:
<img src=”http://www.companyabc.com/image.gif” width=”75” height=”60” alt=”Titleof Image”>

 

Read earlier blogs on “Guide to a Better HTML Email Design” on Kenscio Blog.

Share

Guide to a Better HTML Email Design – Part 9

8. Style Sheets

Many Web designers use Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) to simplify the coding process and ensure a consistent style throughout a Website. Use of CSS in HTML emails can be problematic, however, as many email clients will not render style sheets correctly.

Here is a handy reference on whether an email client renders certain types of style sheets correctly.

CSS and Rendering in email Clients

 

Avoid using CSS if possible; but if you must use them, choose the embedded styles also known as ‘inline’. Embed the style within the two container tags and not within the header because some email clients will truncate or strip out the header.

So, add the style within the body tags, like this:

<body>
<div style=“color:#000000;font-weight:bold;“> Main Text </div>
</body>

 

 

Read earlier blogs on “Guide to a Better HTML Email Design” on Kenscio Blog.

Share

Guide to a Better HTML Email Design – Part 8

7. Buttons, Charts & Other Supporting Images

 

Buttons, charts, and other supporting images should use the colors of your design elements to pull the reader’s eye to the images.

Make sure the text color used on your images stands out and is readable. Most importantly, make sure the recipient understands the action. See the examples below:

 

Shop Now button

Buy Now button

Free Shipping button

 

Read earlier blogs on “Guide to a Better HTML Email Design” on Kenscio Blog.

 

Share

Guide to a Better HTML Email Design – Part 7

6. Color and Background Color

 

In everything from images to fonts, colors play an important role in the email design process but can also create problems. For example, don’t choose a font color such as a muted gray on a gray background that makes your headlines and calls-to-action difficult to read. And don’t run the risk of hiding valuable information in your emails by blending the content into the background.
Men and women react differently to colors, but several polls on color preferences by gender and age yield interesting results:

 

Target Audience Favorite Colors Least Favorite Colors
Females Blue, Purple, Green
(all “cool” colors)
Orange, Brown, Gray
(“warm” & “neutral” colors)
Males Blue, Green, Black
(two “cool” & one “neutral” color)
Brown, Orange, Purple
(“neutral”, “warm” & “mixed” colors)
All Genders Preferences for Green decrease with age;
Preferences for purple increase with age
Dislike of Orange increases with age

 

For more information on color preferences and perceptions, check out these resources:
http://desktoppub.about.com/cs/color/a/symbolism.htm
http://desktoppub.about.com/od/howcolorworks/l/aa_colorsee.htm

 

Background Color

Use a white or very light-colored background with a dark to medium font color to make it easy for recipients to read your email message. Also, if you use background colors in sidebar boxes contain them within tables and avoid using a body background color, because Web-based clients remove the body tag and typically place its attributes within a table. Email clients such as Microsoft Outlook might retain the specified background color when replying to or forwarding the email, but other clients use their colors, making message text difficult to read in some instances.

 

Read earlier blogs on “Guide to a Better HTML Email Design” on Kenscio Blog.

Font, Font Size and Font Color – Guide to a Better HTML Email Design – Part 6

Using Forms in HTML Emails – Guide to a Better HTML Email Design – Part 5

Validate HTML Content and Avoid Using Scripts – Guide to a Better HTML Email Design – Part 4

HTML Email Coding Guidelines – Guide to a Better HTML Email Design – Part 3

HTML Email Layout – Guide to a Better HTML Email Design – Part 2

Guide to a Better HTML Email Design – Part 1

Share

Guide to a Better HTML Email Design – Part 6

5. Font, Font Size and Font Color

 

In general, only universally-supported fonts such as Arial and Times New Roman should be used in email messages. Arial is a font that was specifically designed for onscreen readability. Studies indicate that Web users prefer Arial, Verdana and Tahoma to others when viewing Web pages and email.

If you include fonts that are not loaded on your recipients’ machines, their email clients will substitute different fonts, which can affect your design. When using a special font (such as the unique font for a company logo), place it within an image.

Fonts can be specified in pixels, points or HTML font size value. Use a point size no smaller than 10 pixels, 10 point, or size “2”.

Beware of using white as a font color. While it is tempting to use a dark background and white font to make the text stand out, many spam filters identify the use of white (#FFFFFF) in a font tag as a possible spam trigger. Spammers often use a white font on white backgrounds to hide information from recipients. Use your color wheel to find contrasting colors that can accentuate your message and readability.

 

Read earlier blogs on “Guide to a Better HTML Email Design” on Kenscio Blog.

 

Using Forms in HTML Emails – Guide to a Better HTML Email Design – Part 5

Validate HTML Content and Avoid Using Scripts – Guide to a Better HTML Email Design – Part 4

HTML Email Coding Guidelines – Guide to a Better HTML Email Design – Part 3

HTML Email Layout – Guide to a Better HTML Email Design – Part 2

Guide to a Better HTML Email Design – Part 1

Share

Guide to a Better HTML Email Design – Part 1

Email marketing is one of the most powerful and effective forms of marketing today. It is quick to deploy, offers immediate and highly-measurable results, enables advanced segmentation and personalization, and delivers a high return on investment.

However, achieving maximum results from your HTML email requires experience and expertise. Simple mistakes in the implementation of HTML emails can seriously affect delivery or usability and cripple your ROI.

To help marketers optimize results from their email marketing efforts, Kenscio has created this complete guide to create effective HTML email. These technical and design best practices give marketers the ability to improve their own email marketing campaigns. This guide is best shared amongst email marketers and the HTML coding staff that supports your email development efforts.

In this guide we will cover:

  1. Email Layout
  2. HTML coding do’s and don’ts
  3. Validate HTML content and avoid using scripts
  4. Using forms in HTML emails
  5. Font and font size
  6. Color
  7. Background colors
  8. Font colors
  9. Buttons, charts & other supporting images
  10. Style sheets
  11. Images
  12. Image alt tags
  13. Creating a Web version of your email newsletter
  14. Preview panes and blocked images
  15. Number of hyperlinks
  16. Phishing and HTML Links
  17. Message file size
  18. Length of email messages
  19. Personalization
  20. Individualization
  21. Navigation of email messages
  22. Search capability in email
  23. Email format/Versions
  24. Add to Address Book
  25. Forward-to-a-friend functionality
  26. Rich Media/Flash
  27. Video email
  28. Tips Email Deliverability to Inbox
  29. Five common flaws that you can avoid in Email Marketing Campaigns

Everyday we will cover the above topics in details. Keep visiting the Kenscio blog to learn in depth of each topic.

Your feedback and comments are most welcome!

Happy Reading!

@Kenscio Email Design Team

Copy rights to articles on Kenscio blog reserved. Any article from Kenscio blog can be reproduced by providing credits to Kenscio or providing a link back to Kenscio blog.

Share

Copyright © 2017 Kenscio Blog. All rights reserved.
iDream theme by Templates Next | Powered by WordPress