Tag: google

The all new Pinterest inspired Gmail’s Promotion Tab

Yes, you read that right! Gmail is reportedly making changes under the hood to transform the traditional looking rows of emails, with a sweet looking grid of images. This change only comes for the Promotions Tab, and this is what Gmail has posted in it’s official blog:

“Promotional mail has a lot of images, from pictures of snazzy new shoes to photos of that rock-climbing gym you’ve been wanting to try. But right now, those images are buried inside your messages—and with only subject lines to go on, it can be a challenge to quickly pick out the deals and offers that interest you most. To help you find what you’re looking for faster, you can now sign up for a new field trial for Gmail that lets you view the Promotions tab in a more visual way.”

Just to give you an idea of what this means; the new promotional tab will look like this:

instead of the existing traditional view that looks like this: 

What this means for email marketers? Well for starters, this gives you the opportunity to use creativity to entice your customers with relevant visual cues that complement your subject lines. It also allows you to highlight your brand’s logo to add recognition and authenticity. Gmail also seems to allow you to specify what promotional image to show; else it picks up an image automatically from the mailer. Marketers should not only specify what image to show but actually try to personalize that image for every single user! The brand logo though seems to be pulled through the Google+ page, if you still don’t have one you might want to get it setup immediately.

Get in touch to explore what more you can do with Gmail’s new Primary Tab, Google+, your neighbor’s annoying pet, or any other aspects of your email marketing.

 

 

 

Share

Gmail Inbox Issues and what you need to know

Gmail, since yesterday has been sending bug fix notifications to selected users, whose in-boxes might have experienced involuntary fits in the form of mails getting deleted or being marked as spam. It seems that the notice is only being sent to affected Gmail iOS app users, and these users have been requested to scrutinize their Spam and Trash folders.

The official Notice Says:

“You may have been impacted by a recent issue in Gmail that inadvertently caused some actions (e.g. delete, report spam) taken while viewing a message to be applied to a different message,” Google wrote. “The issue occurred between January 15 and January 22 and is now fixed.”

“We encourage you to check your Trash and Spam folders before February 14, 2014 for any items you did not intend to delete or mark as spam and move them back to your inbox,” Google wrote. “We apologize for any inconvenience.”

 

It must be noted that this bug is different from the “Plagued by emails” bug that was reported earlier this month. This specific bug would kick in when Gmail was accessed via Google search; and flood the user’s mailbox with thousands of unwanted emails. Gmail labeled this as a “Technical Glitch” and seems to have resolved this issue now.

Recommendation for Gmail Users:

If you are a Gmail user we suggest you to verify all the several tabs and folders within Gmail to make sure you don’t miss out any important communication (due to incorrect placement of emails). In case you did receive a big fix notification from Gmail; we would suggest you verify other Gmails apps (reported b Gmail to have possible issues) as well for inconsistencies:

Google Apps status screenshot

Recommendation for Marketers:

In light of such issues, we suggest marketers to reach out to their Gmail recipients, and request them to ensure their communication was not accidentally delivered to Trash or Spam. If such is the case, you should give clear and simple instructions on how your recipients can rectify this. Reach out to us, if you need help with such instructions.

 

Share

The death of “Display all Images” and what it means for you

Last week Google took a bold step by letting images load by default (no more “Display all Images”). One might wonder why the option existed in the first place and there is (or was) a very good reason why it did.

Images used in an email message are most commonly stored at a hosting server; which serves the images on request i.e. when a reader opens the message. This mechanism however can be exploited by spammers to plant malicious code on the reader’s machine, making it a very good reason to block images from all senders by default, and letting the reader decide which ones to load.

Google claims to have found a way to close this loophole by creating a filtering layer between the reader’s machine and the image hosting server. In other words, Google will now use internal proxy servers to request for images, host these images on Google Servers and finally serve images to the customer via Google’s internal network (in case nothing fishy is returned from the original hosting server)

As a Gmail User, this means that your inbox will now load images in all messages on its own and you’ll no longer have to click on “Display all Images”. If you are an Email Marketer, the repercussions may be a slightly different.

For starters, customers will now immediately see the entire email content (and not bits of it as before), since both text and images will load automatically. This in theory should translate into a better email experience for customers and create more opportunities for marketers to further improve email engagement.

On the other hand, Google will now intercept all interaction between the customer and marketer’s server; and effectively create a layer between the marketer and the customer. As a result it will no longer be possible to identify the geographic location, device information or multiple open behaviors of customers.

While this may prevent marketers to dynamically change the email content after sending the email, it will still allow them to target customer with geographic and device friendly content. As far as basic email tracking goes; open, click and conversion tracking will continue to work as before, with an exception to tracking multiple opens, which may no longer be possible. However, this would also mean that all opens are actually tracked (and not left out if someone did not select “Display all Images”) removing the discrepancy in numbers of unique openers & clickers.

While these changes in how Google delivers emails to customers may restrict marketers; it also creates opportunities for marketers to improve engagement, by making clever use of text and images.

Get in touch with us to find how you can make the most out of engagement with Gmail based customers.

Share

Copyright © 2017 Kenscio Blog. All rights reserved.
iDream theme by Templates Next | Powered by WordPress